The Name

definition of subalpineWe had decided we wanted the company’s logo to use aspen trees or leaves as the base of the design, but we had to think of a name that possibly related to that as well. We also toyed with ideas that related to our location and realized we spent most of our summer outings in the Subalpine ecosystem.

Technically, the Subalpine zone of the Rocky Mountains is characterized by its lack of aspen trees as they typically grow at a slightly lower elevation. But as illustrated in the photo gallery below, we often pass through these aspen groves on the way to the Subalpine ecosystem.

I’ve had some people get confused by seeing the name written out. It’s one of those words that doesn’t quite look like it’s been spelled correctly, especially since it’s not hyphenated. We also like the way it sounds when paired with the word ‘design.’ Don’t let the prefix ‘sub’ make you think our work’s sub-standard or subordinate (less important). It’s just the Alpine ecosystem is a little too cold and desolate for our tastes.

Some of our favorite Subalpine Spots:

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At around 11,600 feet above sea level, Ellwood pass is a great example of a subalpine zone.

We spent my 25th birthday camped out here at Ellwood pass. Pictured are a couple of our dogs playing in the subalpine meadow.

As mentioned in this post, we often pass through large aspen groves on the way to subalpine ecosystems. This is the road to Poage lake above Beaver Creek Reservoir.

This is also on the way to Poage Lake where you are finally in the subalpine zone. Photographed in June 2005 note how much snow is still on the peaks.

Shot from the same campsite as the previous photo but the opposite direction. I had to include this one as I remember a graphic designer friend of mine being very 'taken' with this image.

Finally made it to Poage lake, which sits at just over 11,000 feet.

And the sunsets aren't too shabby from this elevation either. These photos of Poage were taken in July 2005. What a difference a month makes, but you can still see some snowfields on the peak.